<p>View of Carlingford from the sea</p>

View of Carlingford from the sea

Memories

David Smyth

29 January 2017

Son of John Smyth Castletown Cooley
Many happy holidays over the years and memory's More > (0 comments)

Molly Rafferty

29 January 2017


The Cooley Show
In the 1950s there was a disagreement at The Cooley Show as to which was The Best Horney Ram
of the show .Molly Rafferty from the Ramperts Greenore who worked for years in Woods' cafe in Newry Street Carlingford penned this poem to mark the occasion.
She makes reference to the following people:

“Big Dan” was Dan Ferguson of Castletown Cooley,father of Danny ,Ambose, Kitty, Gerard,Patsy, Phil and Josie.

Thomas Woods Newry St who farmed in Castletown Cooley father of Margaret Liam Tom and Eileen.

Andy White Castletown Cooley

“The Rev Doctor”:Was Doctor Callan P.P. Of Cooley

“Reillys mare”is reference to Reillys in Glenmore

''Walty'' was Walter Brown from Millgrange, a horseman and jockey who worked for some time for James Woods Eblana House Newry St.

Mc Donalds tent was the pub run by M J McDonald Park St Dundalk

Mr Kieran was the headmaster in The Bush Tec.as it was then

The Cooley Show
It was at the show in Cooley
That the incident took place
That caused a frown of worry
On the poor committee's face
For after all their trouble
and when things were running smooth
To think a man from Castletown
Could be so awfully rude

Some sheepmen were feeling cheerful
and were there to try their luck
When Big Dan Ferguson told the judge
“You wouldn't know a buck”

Tommy Woods was smiling
For he got the prize he sought
Big Dan held all the laurels
At the show ground in Dundalk.
Andy White was furious
At what his neighbour done,
To insult a Judge from Mourne
After asking him to come.

Now Dan was very angry
And he says “Youse know quite well
That there's not a Woods in Carlingford
Would beat my Horney Ram”

Walty went for the Rev.Doctor
To get him on the sod
For if anyone could stop the row
'twas the Holy man of God.
But the Doctor wasn't listening
He says “excuse me,but I'm wanted over there,
there's an important matter to be settled
Concerning Reilly's mare”

Then Mister Kieran intervened
And took Big Dan away
And off they went to Mc Donald's tent
To finish off the day.
And as Dan stood at the counter
He vowed that let it be his loss or gain
That a Mourne judge at a Cooley show
Would never stand again.

Molly Rafferty R.I.P.
Wednesday, July 08 2009 - 05:58 PM
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John J Murphy -1829/1906

29 January 2017

John J Murphy, son of John Murphy & Rose Fagan, and Mary Carne daughter of James Carne & Biddy Boyle all of Carlingford in early 1800's
emigrated to America in 1851 -
Have their history available
I'm the great-grandson of John J Murphy /
Peter R. O'Brien - email
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Jane Mc Parland Poland

29 January 2017

RECORDING A MEMORY
Browsing your site brought back some fond memories. Holidays spent in Carlingford. My father was Brendan McParland son of John and Elizabeth Elmore McParland. My grandmother was a native of Carlingford and that’s why my father loved to go there. My father never drove but he bought a caravan and had it towed to the North Commons and with the permission of a man my father knew (I think it was John Francis O’Hagan) the caravan was parked at the start of the ‘Old Road’ down into Carlingford and from then on our weekends and summer holidays were spent at the Caravan. I recall climbing a mountain with my parents and three brothers; my father carrying a tin of white paint to a place on the mountain that he referred to as the ‘White Mans Face’ his purpose was to freshen the paint on the face. My father was a seaman and a great storyteller he told us children that ‘the face on the mountain was a land mark for ships at sea’ .I would love to know has anyone else a name for this land mark and how it came to be there? My Uncle Jim Mc Parland wrote a poem about the North Commons which he said was inspired by a visit to my father’s caravan on the North Commons.
Jane Mc Parland Poland

THROUGH THE EYES OF A CHILD
By Jim Mc Parland
There’s a place called the Commons that I used to know
It over looks Carlingford Bay.
Where often in childhood down there I did go
And those memories are with me to stay.
The Burn where we sailed our wee boats is now dry
It’s overgrown, ruined and wild.
And oft I go back to those scenes long gone by
I first saw through the eyes of a child.

I climbed Slieve Foy Mountain and walked by the streams
I watched the trout leap in the pool
And often I thought, but it was just idle dreams
That I hated to go back to school.
When School days were over, down there I would go
To that place that is rugged and wild.
Back to the scenes that I knew long ago
I first saw through the eyes of a child.

Those days have all past now, the old folk are gone
And new folk have come there to stay.
It was there that I first heard the lark sing at dawn
To greet every new summer day.
It was there in the evening the curlew would call
From the mountain so rugged and wild.
In that place called the Commons, the best spot of all
I first saw through the eyes of a child.
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Kevin Woods

29 January 2017

Can the person who filled in the memory of Lizzie
Nicholson on the Castle Hill contact me at

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