<p>View of Carlingford from the sea</p>

View of Carlingford from the sea

Memories

Shelagh O'Neill

29 January 2017

I remember returning home with my father Anthony in 2005 to visit Glenmore where his own father John was born in 1905. I say returning home, as I had never been to Glenmore before, but when I was there I felt like a salmon feels when it finally reaches its destination after traveling thousands of miles across the ocean to where it was born. My father himself had only been back once before with granddad in 1938 when he was just 12 years old and they had walked the whole way from Dundalk station to Glenmore. My father stayed next door with the Donnelly family and remembers being very embarrassed at staying with a lot of girls! He remembers my Great Grandmother, Mary O'Neill (ne Reilly) sitting in the corner of the old house dressed all in black. My father also vividly remembers the old Glenmore church with it's arch and slabs of stone laid by his ancestors, so much so we spent hours driving round trying to find it! Only to discover it had been rebuilt and a car park was now in it's place. That's progress! He recalled to me walking to the top of Slieve Foy with two of his cousins, Jerry and Albert and remembered how he cried when he reached the top he was so scared. He felt he was on top of the world. When we finally made it back to the top together fifty five year later he laughed at how he had felt back then as a boy and also laughed to his cousins Jerry and Albert who were no longer there that he wasn't crying now! Instead he has brought me home, his daughter, Shelagh who had made my own special journey with him to be there. Home again. We went to see Mary Reilly who lived up from the old house and as soon as I walked through the door she said she felt like crying as I looked the image of my Great Grandmother Mary. I knew I had come home again. I had always felt so tied to Ireland but as my mother and father had separated when I was just three I had never known why. So many unanswered questions. Great Granmother Mary and Great Grandad Andrew had had eight children, Mary (Minnie), Tom, Alice (who died aged 8), Elizabeth (who emigrated to Australia), John, Andrew, Peter and James. All of the children were the best turned out children you could imagine and how Mary was able to do that in the little cottage they all live in will always amaze me. When I was taken to the house, now a just a shed, I stood and wept. How she must have felt seeing all of her children leave her and emigrate to find work must have broken her heart. I can't imagine it. I feel so grateful that I was able to make it back to Glenmore with my father and see where we came from before he passed away last November. We spent so much of our lives apart, but walking up that hill together we found not just each other but how our roots were so entwined with one another and with Glenmore which will always stay with me forever. More > (0 comments)

Aisling Woods Mc Cormack

29 January 2017

My Dad
It is Friday morning 1st May 2009 and I have just received a text from my father to say that he will be live on radio LMFM at approximately 10:45am to promote his new website www.carlingfordpeople.com. I'm not quite sure where to locate this particular station as I am a regular listener to Pat Kenny who broadcasts between 10am and 12 noon.

Excitedly, I dash into the office, with Jason, my 16th month old hot on my heels and do a quick search on the internet. I return to the kitchen and tune in my radio accordingly. It is only 09:45am so I busy myself with various things to do conscious not to venture too far from the vicinity of the radio lest I miss his moment!

Dad has been retired now for just over 4 years and spent the first year engaging in one of his most favourite past times - the garden! He has always been a forward thinker and so threw himself into creating a garden at the back of our house which would be both his and Mums whenever they should decide to sell "Shalom". Some years prior to his retirement, he had a back operation from which he never quite fully recovered but despite this he was not prepared to sacrifice his passion for gardening. The pains however threatened to get worse and some months later he found himself back in the Mater Hospital undergoing a fourth back procedure.

Having slowly recovered from his operation Mum insisted he take things easy and perhaps in hindsight slightly regrets the notion as she was soon to find her husband taking up permanent residence in the kitchen, perched comfortably on his newly acquired leather swivel chair, eyes fixed on the screen in front! With the prospect of a new and exciting idea on the horizon, the garden had to take a back seat, however is consistently and carefully rescued from neglect by Mum who gives it the attention it needs and deserves.

As I wait for the DJ to announce my father, I am drawn to the website and decide to record a memory. I am stiffened at the realisation that none come to mind and am left feeling a little distraught that perhaps I have none to share. I abandon the PC as I hear Dads voice over the airwaves.

He begins quietly with hesitation in his voice, stumbling a little over his words. I know that although he is a more than competent orator the anticipation of such an interview would have tied many knots in his stomach. As the interview progressed, my sense of his nervousness dissipated as he found his stride. He spoke of days of old and people that has passed but had not been forgotten. He talked about community and the importance of it and family. I felt a sense of pride as the interview came to a close.

As that day progressed, my mind was filled with on ocean of memories from my first kiss in the Queens Garden of King Johns Castle to the Oyster Festivals of old, from Pope John Paul’s visit to Drogheda to my first and only year in St. Michaels College Omeath (now The Tain Village) with Father Kenny as principal .

I will at some future date enjoy recounting in detail some of these memories but for today this memory of my father is the one I would like to share.

Ais xo
Monday, May 18 2009 - 11:08 PM
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Marie Sheelan

29 January 2017

My memory of Carlingford was PJ O'Hare babysitting me. Let me explain!!
My dad was Henry Murphy he was a Rent Collector but also was a Home Assistance Officer for the Cooley Peninsula. ( Fancy word now Community Welfare Officer ) He had two jobs and now its divided into three! Wont comment on the Public Sector here Ha Ha.
Anyway I use to go to Irish Dancing in Carlingford, he was always late collecting me, so I had to wait in PJ's bar, the sweet area mind you on a high stool. PJ's gave me hot orange every week without fail.
He use to encrypt words and each week I had a task of figuring out the townland of the Cooley area. Prize was a Cadburys bar of chocolate each week.
God to this day I still love plain chocolate.
So thanks to PJ I now have a chocolate addiction! :)More > (0 comments)

Janet McBride Keller

29 January 2017

Coming Home 2001
Keller & Associates

St. Louis, MO 63118

June 2001

Driving north on the road from Dublin I saw the soft peaks of the Cooley Mountains begin to take shape in the mist.

I was coming home to Carlingford, the first member of my family to do so in more than 150 years.

I had read what little is available about the town but, if it is a town that time has forgotten, it is equally an afterthought among travel writers. None of their adjectives "small," "charming," "a nice day trip out of Dublin," the usual favorites, had prepared me for the magic of Carlingford.

It is an ancient town, perhaps the most wonderfully medieval of villages I have experienced in my limited travels. Its narrow streets terrace upwards from Carlingford Lough, an inlet of the Irish Sea. At midday, brightly colored boats of all description wait on their silt perches or bob in distant shallows for the return of the tides.

There’s an old saying that goes: "In Europe 100 miles is considered a long way; in America, 100 years is considered a long time." In Carlingford, more than anywhere else I visited in Ireland, there is a sense that time is an unending and unbreakable thread, and all of us who go there are beads on that thread. I cannot know exactly how the village looked 150 years ago but feel certain that it is simply faces, not structures or spirit, that have changed in that time. Perhaps I am an incurable romantic; perhaps I have been overwhelmed by the fantasies of walking where my ancestors walked; and perhaps I have been caught up in the magic of Carlingford.

My father’s grandfather, Terence McBride, left Carlingford in 1848 with his brother Peter to seek their fortunes in America. Terence married late and lived to be very old, telling and retelling the stories of Ireland to anyone who would listen until he died at the age of 95 during my father’s 15th year. Dad and his siblings, two of whom are still living, heard the stories of the Famine, and of the brothers’ flight from Ireland on a ship that foundered, leaving them to be rescued by a passing vessel and brought to harbor near Boston. He didn’t know, so we didn’t learn, the term "Coffin Ship," for many years.

The young McBride brothers eventually helped arrange passage for nine of their 12 other brothers and sisters, along with their mother, Mary Donnelly McBride, and several members of other Carlingford families. One of these, Anne Rice, became Terence’s wife and my great-grandmother. They scattered across the vastness of America seeking whatever fortunes awaited them. Gradually, as they settled in such diverse settings as Massachusetts, Wisconsin, California and, of course, Missouri, the threads that had bound them in Carlingford came undone by the thousands of miles that separated them here.

But Terence told stories that would eventually be passed along to me, and like many Irish-Americans, I came to long for Ireland. This was assuaged somewhat by learning the music and history of the country, but the ache to go there and see it for myself remained, nurtured through years of tight budgets, young children, developing careers.

I believe there is a reason as to why Irish-Americans seem more nationalistic and drawn to our homeland than any other group save possibly for our fellow Americans whose families came from Africa: we didn’t want to leave in the first place! We had no choice, but the uprooting left a longing that I sometimes think is imbedded in our genes.

And now I was back, along with my husband Tom, a great-grandson of Cork and Kerry who’s sandy hair and freckles mark his origins as surely as the black hair and pale skin of the northeastern Irish do theirs. As I walked among the townspeople of Carlingford I saw—or at least fancied I did—the faces of dear ones long departed as well as my own 21-year-old Danny back in the ‘States. I thought of a spot so far away from Carlingford, in a tiny Catholic cemetery in Missouri, where Terence and Anne, all of their children and grandchildren down to a great-great grandchild rest together. Someday I will join them in this place where my family sleeps, but for now I was back where my family began.

We took a room at McKevitt’s in the center of the village which put us in a perfect position to walk down to the marina or "down the street and up a wee hill" to St. Michael’s Catholic Church. Between those points were shops selling first-rate crafts and Irish goods at very reasonable prices, and the Carlingford Heritage Center (which, to our dismay, was closed because of Foot and Mouth precautions that were in place throughout Ireland.) There are also the ruins of an ancient abbey and remnants of stone walls that once encircled the town.

One of the many delightful surprises of Carlingford is its ability to feed and bed its visitors with a level of comfort and sophistication that exceeds all expectations. We ate a fine meal at the Marina and another at McKevitt’s where we met up with some young women from Belfast down for a holiday. Although still relatively unknown to the outside world, its location just over an hour’s drive from both Dublin and Belfast, makes Carlingford a popular weekend getaway for people from both cities. They come for the food, which we barely had time to sample; for the craic at McKevitts and the Oyster Catcher Bistro; for the vast array of water sports; for the gentle mountains that beckon the walker; for the sheer beauty of Ireland at her best.

Like so many first-time visitors to Ireland we tried to do too much and drive too far in our 11 days there and, much as I treasure all my memories of the trip, I feel I barely touched the surface of the magic of Carlingford. The longing is still there…the ache to go back. Only next time it won’t just be for Terrence and Anne. Next time it will be for me and I’ll stay as long as I can.

Janet McBride Keller



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Clodagh Rogan

29 January 2017

Spending many a Saturday from early morning till late at night visiting my grandparents and uncle with my Dad Peter and my siblings. I looked forward to visitng John's Castle, crab fishing and going out on the speed boats (during the summer months).Our uncle Patrick used to take us over to the village on a Saturday evening to buy comics and sweets. We'd arrive back in Kells very late and exhausted from the days activities.More > (0 comments)